Monday, March 20, 2017

What Does Fourth Grade Research Look Like? #resvt #vted #vsla



Fourth graders are researching and taking notes for their Capstone independent research projects. Fourth grade research can look like reading printed articles and books (see photo above). It can also  look like reading websites or watching online videos. One student viewed a video and website and took notes about a prototype of a flying car to help answer his research question, "How will cars look in the future?


More information at www.aeromobil.com


Another student took notes from an online encyclopedia to help answer his question, "How do we remember things?"




We are very proud of all our scholars, and we can't wait to see their finished Capstone Projects!


Friday, February 24, 2017

February 2017 at the RES Library, by the numbers #resvt #vsla #vted

Fourth grade scholars looking for resources to answer
their research questions about animation and pottery

February 2017 at the RES library, by the numbers:
  • Number of library books and other materials checked out by RES scholars, families, and staff: 1328 -- that's 78 items per day in our three weeks of school this month
  • Number of TumbleBooks electronic books read and listened to: 168
  • Number of times scholars used the PebbleGo nonfiction research database: 316
  • Number of scholar visits to the library: over 700 (14 classes per week plus additional class visits plus individual visits)
  • Number of scholars served by librarian visits to  classrooms: over 150
  • Number of fourth graders who developed research questions for their independent capstone projects: 49. You can read their amazing questions here: Fourth Grade Capstone Research Questions

Monday, February 20, 2017

Fourth Grade Capstone Project Research Questions #resvt #geniushour #vted

Cross-posted from the Think Create Collaborate blog.




RES fourth graders have been working on their interest-based Capstone Projects in their Enrichment Library classes.  They have each developed a research question they will use to focus their investigations. We are so impressed by the thoughtfulness of the questions! Our students have a great breadth of interests, and we can't wait to see the results of their research!

-Mrs. Rankin and Mrs. Redford

How do guitars, drums, and pianos make sounds?
  • How do architects make their plans?
  • How do things get their names?
  • World War II: What was it like at home during that time period?
  • How do people create good doodles?
  • How do people get evidence of monsters?
  • Why would someone make an instrument?
  • How are coral reefs made?
  • How did World War II submarines work?
  • How did the Battle of the Bulge happen?
  • How do inventors come up with inventions?
  • How are cows treated from birth to death?
  • How will cars look in the future?
  • How are electronic games made?
  • How do different deep sea creatures survive?
  • Why did some people join Hitler?
  • What features make supercars so fast?
  • How did they make Bugattis so fast?
  • What makes an animal a rodent?
  • How is a black hole formed?
  • How do computers work?
  • How do you care for and train a bunny?
  • How do people use drones for photography?
  • How do we remember things?
  • What is the history of ballet?
  • What is the history of horseback riding?
  • How do magicians do tricks?
  • How do you choreograph a dance?
  • How did the Civil War start?
  • How are stop motion movies made?
  • How do you a code a video game?
  • How do you build a treehouse?
  • How did Harry Houdini do his magic tricks?
  • Why do volcanoes erupt?
  • How is time and space the same thing?
  • How do artists make different clay pots?
  • How did women's clothing in the 1900s develop over time?
  • How do you make a cartoon?

Friday, February 3, 2017

January 2017 at the RES library, by the numbers #resvt #vsla #vted

Second graders working on their
blog posts about animals

January 2017 at the RES library, by the numbers:
  • Number of library books and other materials checked out by RES scholars, families, and staff: 1553 -- that's 78 items per day.
  • Number of TumbleBooks electronic books read and listened to: 339
  • Number of times scholars used the PebbleGo nonfiction research database: 467
  • Number of scholar visits to the library: over 700 (14 classes per week plus additional class visits plus individual visits)
  • Number of scholars served by librarian visits to  classrooms: over 200
  • Number of second graders who researched, wrote, and blogged about interesting animals: 52. You can see their awesome blog posts on the RES Second Grade Animal Blog!.